Overseas Filipinos are Greedy Cowards… NOT

I received a letter that I know contains sentiments – a common feeling about people who are still in the Philippines – and how they view the more outspoken Pinoys like moi who have left. Normally, I would dismiss this kind of letter. But knowing this came from someone important (to me anyways) – I thought of giving some time to go through it and reply without being condescending, obnoxious, or offensive. Consider this as a normal conversation between adults. Apparently, this is a recurring theme that I hear from time to time in one form or another. The long and short of this argument is that – those who left the Philippines are greedy and cowards, that those who stayed are selfless and brave – I beg to disagree.

But first, let me share that snippet of a remark:

You have nothing good to say about the Philippines.  But these adversities that we meet everyday are the hot metals that test the resiliency and courage within each and every one of us.   It brings out the best and the finest  in us , making it the survival of the fittest, thus in effect  an individual effort of setting us free from overwhelming odds of negativities that surround us.

Only the cowards and the weak , who have only the desire for financial gains and those who thirst for physical satisfaction of the senses , would flee at the first sight of discomfort which we call challenges giving us the power to face and in effect empowering us with more strength in character  building of being responsible for our lives and not make excuses of external circumstances as a  psychological crutch as justification in carrying over the past of their inability to detach from their negative habits.

It is a simplified issue ,  is physical and material gains sufficient to buy lasting happiness of the heart, the unspoken dialogue of camaraderie, and silent communion of peace  truth and stability  ?

Adversity or Productivity?

Adversity is not a one size fits all shirt. Just like corruption. There’s the garden variety corruption and then there’s the systemic corruption arising from a systemic lack of economic opportunities. In my case there is personal adversity – and there is systemic adversity. I don’t have a problem dealing with personal adversity, however when the source of adversity is not just common to you but takes on a collective nature, one has to start thinking. At times, it’s a choice between changing the direction of a well-oiled ship, plugging a leak in a ship, redesigning a ship, even… abandon the ship. – so you may live to reach your destination.

Having said that – when it comes to “adversity” – simple lang yan, you guys want to put up with the crap in the Philippines – that’s YOUR choice, and I respect that. I have been living and working in that “adversity” for the past thirty five conscious years in my life and given the average Filipino male life span of 65 years old, to spend twenty years in another environment – to learn the attitudes, behaviors, and practices – K – A – P (Knowledge-Attitude-Practices) that various cultures have adopted in order to bring about a more humane society – is an adventure in knowledge. To be able to see that there are other ways of life – other than “the Filipino way”.

Is it wrong to seek continuous improvement – not just in our shores – but in other shores as well? Knowledge and wisdom do not exhibit “patriotism” – it is there for any member of humanity that seeks to partake of it.  You either do the right thing or you don’t (for example, thou shall not steal or don’t vote for thieves, idiots, and crooks) – regardless of nationality, belief (or the lack thereof), gender, and age. The question of adversity is not whether it happens in the Philippines or not – it happens like in any other country.

The uniqueness of the Philippines “adversity” is that it is self-imposed – we complain about theft, but it was us who let the thieves in fully knowing well that they are thieves. Filipinos are so oblivious of the thievery – they don’t get enraged anymore, perhaps they have become too desensitized that to a Filipino, a country where the corrupt are jailed for real is a delusion. Most of the Filipinos  can’t imagine such a government – and yet, our neighbors can and have put their houses in order.

What exactly am I supposed to do? Wage a quixotic campaign waxing emo politics? – been there, done that – Philippines is worse off. I cut off the hydra’s head in 1986 only to see it give rise to more – there has to be a better way. One can chop off the hydra’s head – and indulge in “adversity” cutting off each head that regrows. Or, one need not indulge in adversity – burn the chopped head off, and no heads can regrow.

Volunteer-work, charity-work, all piecemeal activities that do not lead to the burning off the chopped head are exercises in addiction to adversity – the adversity has to exist in order for people to find meaning. In my case, I find meaning in demolishing “adversity” – how about that? Why settle for volunteer work if an extensive strategic campaign can lead to charter change which unleashes the Philippines true potential to create system-wide prosperity? Why can’t Filipinos exert the same effort, attitude,  and wherewithal to adopt and change – dahil retarded ang Pinoy?

Why be addicted to systemic adversity when there are better brilliant long-lasting alternatives? You can indulge in acts that show how kind and compassionate you are to the least of the brethren – OR, you can strike at the heart of the problem – the institutionalization of protectionism in the Constitution which has left the Philippines with the crumbs in the recent waves of trade and investments. Though I have the tendency to do both.

Courage

It seems there is a pissing contest  between “courage” of living in the Philippines – and living abroad.

“Courage” in the local context seems to be, courage to put up against harassment, threats of bodily harm, threats to your property, the capacity to tolerate LOUSY and EXPENSIVE telehone/water/electricity – like 3 hour brownouts! The year is 2010 peepz, for gadzooks panay pa rin ang brownout. Is this an opportunity to show how he can be kind to others like us who don’t have light, water, and electricity? Or is this a lousy inept policy that needs to be corrected?

If we have “courage” – why don’t we have the courage to vote for people who are doing right thing, on their own merit – why don’t we have the courage to buck the popular and do what’s right? Based on the voting results where Pinoys selected candidates based on winnability and popularity – para “in”, I say most Pinoys courage are plain false bravado but are intellectual cowards. I don’t want to be associated with intellectual cowards.

Tell you what – there is bigger courage going overseas – going at it ALONE, ON YOUR OWN MERIT – NO ONE ELSE, BUT I and MY  WITS – no crutches, no social nets, no nothing – all repercussions all mine to bear – and THRIVING despite of, and inspite of naysayers.

The Greater Good

The Philippines is for conformists – I am not a conformist – never have never been. I do not believe in amputating an individual’s soul and aspirations for  “the greater good”. I will sink and swim with that belief. I wouldn’t be quick to judge leaving the Philippines as cowardice, there are times you have to retreat so you can fight another day – come up with a better plan and come back with a vengeance like the Count of Monte Cristo. Why burn yourself up? Take it in stride, go with the rhythm of the seasons of ones life.

When I give others my truth, I am open to receiving their truth as well, and vice-versa. Is it wrong to point out that we as a nation would rather vote for thieves and lazy people instead of taking the time out to use our brains? I’ve done what I can for “the common good” – gave it the best years of my life – sacrificing MY happiness so that anyone other than me will be happy – It was either to make someone else other than I -parents, relatives, friends/amigas/amigos, or society in general, happy – except me.

But, that is nearly EVERYONE’s modeling – we did not know any better. The pressure to conform in Philippine society is a vestige of the colonial policies – a command and control mentality that everyone’s role is for the happiness of the Spanish crown or whoever was the colonial power at that time. Lots of us still put up with the feudal and colonial mindset  – I don’t and will not anymore – I’ve had it – forty years and counting.

I believe life is more about finding one’s happiness than indulging in collective misery. If the Pinoy collective chooses misery, I respect that. But the collective should also respect the fact that – there are other societies that reject the misery and look for ways to solve it – that’s my kind of society, I will seek it, pursue it, learn from it, apply the lessons learned. If Pinoys reject the fruit of such lessons – it’s their loss NOT MINE.  The Philippines can keep the title Asia’s Laggard, Most Dangerous Country for Journalists, Nation of Servants, Most Corrupt Country in ASEAN. The typical Pinoy schmoe will prefer to sweep the matter under the carpet and pretend everything is A-okay – who are we kidding folks? We lie to the world, and now we even have to lie to ourselves when we should be facing this head-on, stop it in its track. To achieve this, we don’t need rocket scientists – we just need to think, as in really, sit down and take stock – do we really want another good-for-nothing dumbass as president?

It’s not just the money, It’s also about FREEDOM

America (or any developed country preferred for emigration)  is not just about the money. More than that America is about freedom – to say and be who you are, to realize your potentials, without having to worry about your bodily harm when you speak your truth. It is also about second chances – to live your life on the basis of who you are – not on the basis of pedigree and clan consensus.

Money is just a byproduct of the responsible use of freedom. Be irresponsible – and you lose money. Be responsible, be focused, and disciplined, be smart (after all activity is not productivity) – and you gain money. Money is just a scorecard – it’s just a means to an end, it’s not the end in itself. After all, how can the charities of the world exist if not for the people who felt no shame in making money for their trouble? Money is just like a scalpel – in the hands of a murderer it can destroy lives, in the hands of a surgeon it can save lives.

Jewels and Pigs

Think about this – every project that I touch in the company I work for, improves not just YOUR life, but EVERYONE’s life, because I make food, clothing, and shelter more affordable ALL OVER THE PLANET not just the barrio called Philippines.

If I were in the Philippines – I’ll be an atsoy of an asshole boss, unrecognized, under-compensated, always in the background  – I have no impact there, it’s a WASTE of my time and I will be so miserable with the LOUSY pay and the LOUSY environment and the LOUSY benefits and the LACKLUSTER officemates and I have to conform with what everyone thinks how I should behave – dios ko maria santisima tabanga – hell no, tapos na ako sa impyernong yan, I choose life – anywhere but the Philippines, I will die early in the Philippines – mamatay ko sa konsumisyon kay napalibutan ko ug BUGO ug KORUP ug mga TSISMOSO ug PAKIALAMERO – people who don’t have a life, whose only excuse for a life is watch me live my life. There has to be something better than this collectively self-imposed misery.

Some prefer the comfort of familiar surroundings, I on the other hand am an explorer, an adventurer – I want to know, live outside the box, find out how the developed countries did it so that I can use the same knowledge and wisdom to spread prosperity and reduce ignorance.  We cannot liberate minds if I we do not liberate their stomachs first. how Likewise, how can we get the lion’s cubs if we don’t enter her den?

Personal Happiness

There seems to be this misguided element common among Filipinos that “learning to love yourself” is evil and selfish. I used to believe all that crap – somehow it was such a thankless job. Para bang people expect that I put them first – e paano naman ako. I think about other people, but it seems they don’t think about me. Mukhang hindi  naman tama yan, that is so one-sided – forty frakking years, I need a break.

It is not wrong to think about your personal happiness – after all how can you spread happiness when you are unhappy? I say seek your happiness first – to thyself be true, I have outgrown the Philippines, I don’t belong there anymore – it’s MY turn to be happy. I will live life on MY TERMS, and NO ONE ELSE, it’s my life and I am happy with where I am at this point in my life. It’s not the best of cards – but one plays to the best, the cards one is dealt with.

If people think am a coward for living here – that’s their problem not mine. Come to think of it, if Filipinos were such a good judge of character, how come they always have thieves, killers, or idiots for leaders? Pinoys are experiencing misery by their own imposition – alangan namang hindi nanakaw yung binoto nilang magnanakaw di ba? E kung gusto nilang magpakatanga, they can go ahead  – Filipinos can reap the negative karma of their negative behavior while I reap the positive karma of my positive behavior – no rocket science.

Physical Comfort

Isn’t this the purpose of a job, a career, an enterprise – to provide for oneself and family. Why in the world will I force the issue of working in the Philippines when I can see that the same amount of effort that I exert elsewhere, brings me (and by extension, my immediate family) more reward.

I work for myself and my family and I dutifully pay my taxes. I went to get an education and developed my skill set so I can provide better for myself and my family. Why fault me for wanting convenience? If you guys are happy with nipa huts that’s fine – you can sleep in the streets if you want, as long as that’s what YOU want. But that’s not what I want – I want to be comfortable so that I am rested and ready to work the following day – be productive.

Basic decency and self-respect tells me that I do not put up with anyone or anybody who does not value me and corollary to that, to go where I am valued. In the Philippines when I blurt out a suggestion, the replies are typical – mahirap, that’s not the way we do it here, that has not been tried before.  What that means to me is they value the old ways that gave them the same tired old sloppy results. Outside the PI, the reply I get is – “that’s a good idea”, “let’s do that; if that’s what it takes to do things right – let’s do it, the right way”; “why didn’t we think of that before”; or “I like the value proposition” – finally some signs of intelligence on this planet.

Say Something Good About the Philippines

What good am I supposed to say about the Philippines? The only good I can say about it is that I have family in the Philippines. Ano pa ba? It gave the world someone like moi? Too righteous and wicked – I love it.. LOL.

Other than that, as a society – that we are good at corruption? that we are good at massacres?

For all the good things that Pinoys do – they can’t run away from the core values of humanity and society – personal responsibility (no one will save the filipinos except themselves – remember the law of karma – Filipinos are just reaping what they have sown – given the harvest of corruption what did the Filipinos sow?

I just cannot be proud of that – if Filipinos have so gotten used to corruption that they shrug it off as if it were a way of life – that such corruption is needed so that the world will see that there are still honest Filipinos.

Do we have to go through such heroics – I mean do we, Filipinos, now have to exert heroic efforts to be honest?  Isn’t that supposed to be an everyday thing – second nature just like breathing. It sure says a lot about Filipinos when an honest deed is celebrated – it means nearly everyone else is dishonest.  Cringe to death? You bet!

Do my reactions make me less Filipino? Let’s face it – the Filipino identity is a work in progress – it’s a blank slate molded by colonial edict. For better or for worse, I was born one, and will die one – a Filipino, holder of a Philippine passport – whether Filipinos like it or not.

Tough luck b*tches -people don’t like what I write – I don’t like it either BUT that’s reality, the feeling is mutual, sweet.

Enjoy the weekend

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41 comments

  1. Anyone can write so many bad things or so many good things about the Philippines in a site but what would writers get in return? Good hits for a website? Filipinos will never learn this way.

    It’s not just the Filipinos’ minds are close to prevailing proven ideas of social progress elsewhere. It’s also the writers of good and bad keep reusing the lens that shouldn’t be used in the first place.

    Filipinos succeeded in OFW deployment, why can’t we just set our eyes on what we ONLY succeeded? Psychologists told us to “want what we have” and not “want what we can never have”.

  2. 1. It’s a great read, but…

    2. Your title is misleading. Consider revising it, because it will turn off the OFW’s even if you mentioned in your first paragraph that you disagree with the statement.

    3. Huwag mo na lang pansinin yung mga taong nakikialam sa mga naga-abroad. Bitter lang sila. They are not pragmatic. Without OFWs, the Philippines will sink.

    4. Yung nagsend ng letter sa yo, sya kaya ang coward. Di nya alam ang hirap na dinadanas ng mga OFWs:

    OFWs are BRAVE:

    – Iiwanan nila pamilya nila para lang makakuha ng mas financially-efficient na trabaho.
    – Yung iba they have to endure racism;
    – Yung iba, they have to deal with tough bosses.
    – Yung iba, they have to deal with differences in religion or culture.

    Tanga at buraot ang nagsabi sa yo na “Overseas Filipinos are Greedy Cowards”.

    Look at his writing:

    * Puro mga emotions that conveniently ignores the problems in our country — Problems that motivates people to work abroad in the first place.

    * It is a fact of life that people travel or choose to live abroad. Kahit si Jose Rizal nag-abroad nag-trabaho. Ang galing nga eh, may binalik din sya sa ating bansa in the end.

    * DI POR QUE NASA PILIPINAS KA, MAKABAYAN KA.

    Sana mabasa nya ito.

  3. *APPLAUSE!!!!!* EXCELLENT ARTICLE BONGV!!! To migrate or become an OFW is no joke. It takes a lot of courage to do it. Does that person who wrote you the letter think that the Tsinoys are weak for leaving China? Or the pioneers who founded America just do not like to face adversity and are cowards? They are far from being those things. I know of some lawyers and business executives who immigrated and started as construction workers or fast food personnel when they started building a new life abroad. How’s that for weakness and cowardice? Just because you put up with adversity does not mean you are resilient. Finding solutions to alleviate such adversities is what really makes a man.

    This is my favorite part of the article:

    “Basic decency and self-respect tells me that I do not put up with anyone or anybody who does not value me and corollary to that, to go where I am valued. In the Philippines when I blurt out a suggestion, the replies are typical – mahirap, that’s not the way we do it here, that has not been tried before. What that means to me is they value the old ways that gave them the same tired old sloppy results. Outside the PI, the reply I get is – “that’s a good idea”, “let’s do that; if that’s what it takes to do things right – let’s do it, the right way”; “why didn’t we think of that before”; or “I like the value proposition” – finally some signs of intelligence on this planet.”

    Great read!

  4. Excellent in the sense that it jibes with what I said in my anti-foreignism article. But even more is how the writer reflects the very basic faults of the Filipino: ethnocentric, backward thinking, egocentric and egotistic. The writer of the letter think only his view is right. It’s as if the Philippines is the most important country in the world. Even if Filipinos think that, that would really be wrong. We have to acknowledge that there’s a world out there, and keeping within our borders is like keeping the chick from breaking the egg and hatching.

  5. ‘“learning to love yourself” is evil and selfish’

    yeah bongV!

    this article hits the mark. i say, let’s focus more on being citizens of the world and not just be stuck in a our own little corner of this planet. the philippines is too small, the whole world is out there. enough with the “pinoy ako” platitudes. i say find yourself where ever that may be.

    seeking the best in us and of the world takes courage and determination and is only possible if we love ourselves enough to expect the best. learning to love oneself takes more courage than to be selfless; being selfless is the easy way out.

    bongV, thank you for writing this 🙂

  6. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Maia, AntiPinoy.Com. AntiPinoy.Com said: Post Edited: Overseas Filipinos are Greedy Cowards… NOT (http://bit.ly/94Pa3P) http://bit.ly/94Pa3P […]

  7. are you saying Pinoys will NEVER have an orderly, honest society? 😀

    Then what the hell are they riding jeepneys for – the internal combustion engine was designed and invented by non-Filipinos?

    are you saying that the Japanese, Koreans, Taiwanese, Singaporeans, Malaysians, Indonesians, Irish – and all other developed economies can adopt proven practices -BUT the Filipinos can’t?

    Then what the hell are Pinoys using the Internet for – it’s invented by the Americans.

    Then what the hell are Pinoys using the cell phone for – it’s not invented by Filipinos.

    Then what the hell are Pinoys using roads for – it’s invented by the Romans and Greeks.

    Then what the hell are Pinoys using electricity for – it’s invented by the Americans.

    Get the drift?

    If you really wanna indulge in xenophobia – Pinoys should start living in caves – that’s the only ORIGINAL FILIPINO technology from these island. even your dominant religion – catholicism is borrowed!! yung orig are the animists.

  8. Considering we’ve been ruled by foreigners for most of our modern history — and continue to be so today considering an economy that still relies on foreign capital and employment to survive — it is so typical that Da Pinoy Mindset would be so self-contradicting.

    Rather than embracing foreign influence we prefer to imprison ourselves in it. Funny thing is the self-righteousness a lot of people take when presuming to (a) judge who has the right to call him/herself “Filipino”, (b) judge who is doing more or less for his/her country, and (c) judge what activity is worthwhile or not — or which one can be considered to be a civic duty or not.

    Pinoy nga naman talaga
    Parang Aso
    Matangkad lang pag naka-upo
    . 😀

  9. Clean cut on the jugular…bleed delusional kababayans! BLEED!

  10. jonphil · ·

    Eye opener.

    Bong, with your indulgence, I posted parts of this article in Pex (Buhay Pinoy).

    Had to do in in parts, attention span of most of our bros are constricted.

  11. Hi jon,

    thanks for reading and sharing it.

    cheers!

  12. hi nonhacker,

    you do have a point, and as you suggested, i have changed the title. thanks for the constructive criticism – it is very much appreciated.

    likewise, your inputs are valuable contributions to this discussion. it’s not a joke to deal with various cultures – i got to learn a lot about others, shed misconceptions, have a new understanding of the commonalities between cultures – but most of all i learn about myself, specially in new unfamiliar situations.

    it was fun recalling my rusty spanish though. i swear, when i worked and lived in miami, i regretted not listening to my spanish teacher. knowing how to speak spanish could have opened more business opportunities – and at the minimum new friends.

  13. John Amend-All · ·

    Agree with Rafterperson, great read. My only hope, Bong, is that one day the country will elect a president who does not suck and all the talented and successful OFWs will consider it worthwhile to return and bring their accumulated knowledge, capital and impatience with lousy service.

  14. Persona non Grata · ·

    They would become coward at a drop of American Visa. They didn’t get it. They have to make up a purpose of their existence in the Philippines like people who cannot know the reason why they exist in the world to conjure God in their mind.

    It is true, it takes courage to live dangerously in the Philippines. If you were wealthy, kidnappings. If you were handsome, muggings. If you were pretty, rape. If you dealt with government, corruption. If you traveled by ferry, sinking. It is survival. If your children go to church, molestation by priests.

    The “left-behind” Filipinos make it appear they are fortunate to make living sensibly sane. That is why the world believes in God to make sense out of their existence.

    As my mentor, Renato Pacifico, always had said, “the only solution is not election, outsourcing of our government”. I agree with him, Filipinos are not “democratically responsible”, may they be in United States or in Australia or Europe. They may appear “democratically responsible” among non-Filipinos, when they are among Filipinos the toxicity and corrosiveness of their culture: jealousy, envy, crabbiness boils over into fist-fights, blog-rage, out-rage.

  15. Persona non Grata · ·

    I have not gone to Philippines in a long time. I go backpack across atlantic, the Caribbean and the Baltic for vacation. My only companion is my 11″ Sony Vaio. Lonely Planet is my guide. I will never ever be on cruise again. Cruise are for old people. Most of all, I do not want to see pathetic looking Filipinos/Filpinas waiting on me with their head down and eyes to the floor. So many times, I have told them “hold your head up! I am with you! I am not “appearing-wealthy” Filipino”.

    I like the Philippines physically, I like the freedom of being away from Filipinos. It is refreshing. It is civilizing. I like being with a singular Filipino but not plurality of throngs of Filipinos. Like what I said so many times, Filipinos shows evil among Filipinos as if evil is a badge of progress.

    Evil is shown in blogs and forums. They are protected by its anonymity. They get incensed by “wrong spellings and erroneous grammatical englsichtzes”. They look down on these Filipinos as if “englischtzes” is a measure of intelligence. The abyss of english-speaking-writing and non-english-speaking-writing Filipinos is so deep and pervasive.

    Filipinos seems to fancy foreign language. When I was in Tuscany I met a Filipino who started this way “Pare, kumusta” then off with his “italianese”.

  16. It was about the strength of democratic framework that has been proven elsewhere that will not work for pinoys for some reasons. People elsewhere will collectively drive to protest on the streets when their leaders stole or abused in the same magnitude as what has been practiced in the Philippines.

    Filipinos will progress of course that’s a given for most societies and I agree technology has a strong impact to it. OFW helps greatly because as some of them climb up in the career leader elsewhere it will feed the current outsourcing model by giving good image to Pinoys or influencing the company’s decision where to outsource.

    People call OFW cowards because they can’t dissociate themselves with the idealism that Pinoys can finally discover something in themselves while remaining in the country.

  17. People call OFW cowards because they can’t dissociate themselves with the idealism that Pinoys can finally discover something in themselves while remaining in the country.

    if this indeed is the context of the discussion, i don’t think coward is the appropriate or correct word to use.

  18. Some people have just to think of it this way: if OFWs were really greedy and cowardly, then they wouldn’t remit even a single centavo back to their home country. I mean, it’s so easy. The rationale is there. Why send back money when you know it’ll be spent by unwise family members and will be kurakoted by the government? Critics of OFWs don’t realize what sacrifices the OFWs are really doing to keep their families afloat.

  19. I finally got the chance to read it.

    Well said boss Bong. It’s straight from the heart 🙂

  20. Poppy Seed · ·

    * Clap Clap Clap!! *

    LOL! Sour Grapes! 😀

  21. Haha, yeah… when in fact, the true sour grapers are the ones back in the country calling OFWs greedy. Pathetic excuses for monkeys in a barrel.

  22. Sometimes, those monkeys are infected with “the clap”. 🙂

  23. Poppy Seed · ·

    I’m working my ass off in another country, send a few of my savings back and this is how they repay me?
    F***ing bunch of freeloaders.

  24. Really…..these monkeys in a barrel make themselves look even worse when they judge others for thinking outside that puny little box to which they’ve been accustomed to living inside forever.

    OFW realists, take a bow. Your critics are just another bunch of anti-pinoys. 🙂

  25. Poppy Seed · ·

    Monkeys with crab traits? 🙂

  26. Jett Rink · ·

    Hmmm if the typical Da Pinoy votes for Gordon , but still goes on his merry ways, what would you think of him?

  27. Persona non Grata · ·

    Based on my observation at ground zero Filipinos are still wary of all presidentiables’ intention so are the bloggers. Like all Philippine newspaper columnists, they get a kick out of it of being proven right on their candidate not necessarily if the candidate can change the Filipinos.

    Changing Filipinos is essential to powerturn 180-degrees the Philippines to second world unto first world.

    By the time a presidentiable sits in Malacanang, cabals of marauding Philippine media will pounce on hapless, helpless President for the corruption of a clerk in Sibuyan Island.

  28. John Paul · ·

    “Those who left the Philippines are greedy and cowards, that those who stayed are selfless and brave – I beg to disagree. ”

    I also beg to disagree.

    Overseas Filipinos are the true selfless and brave. We are the one brave enough to get out of our comfort zone to go migrate. We are the one selfless enough to deprive ourselves of so many things in order to just be able to send a bit more money back home.

    Those who are left are the true greedy and cowards. They are so greedy that if the monthly remittance is a bit short, they start exercising their self entitled right to get angry without considering the fact that they should even be lucky enough to get a monthly remittance. They are such cowards to take risks to better their position in society.

  29. justice league · ·

    Benigno,

    … would be so self-contradicting.

    There are times when even the best make mistakes and contradict themselves.

    But you are certainly not the best and self-contradiction is just one of the things you are full of!

    Funny thing is the self-righteousness a lot of people take when presuming to …. (c) judge what activity is worthwhile or not — or which one can be considered to be a civic duty or not

    Best example there is you referring to parents who seek overseas employment as irresponsible parents in your own thread “Overseas foreign employment – Filipinos’ pwede-na-yan solution to poverty”

    Pinoy nga naman talaga …

    Si Benigno nga naman talaga

    …………

    …………

    But then this is “antipinoy.com” where there seems to be not enough brains in the members of the household to discern your inconsistencies.

  30. I love this article. I do agree that OFWs are not cowards. There’s more to them than meets the eye. Those people who kept rambling nonsense in the news but have no plans of doing anything for the country are the real cowards. Not those people who worked hard to make a change. If not really for the well-being of the country but for those other people who mattered. I can’t blame OFWs for leaving. It’s better to do something than to see your loved ones dying from hunger and all. What is being away from them compared to being able to support and help improve lives. Which would later one, also benefit the country

  31. Not only does your comment generally not make sense (trying making one without looking through a red mist of personal distaste, for a change), the quotes you extracted have discernible context, the way you’ve used them.

    I think someone could use a beer and a nice long nap.

  32. jl:

    b0 Is quite equipped to handle your replies without you having to drag the rest of the AP authors, as I am quite aware of the context upon which the statement was made.

    As your tirade is addressed to him, I will leave it at that.

  33. justice league · ·

    BenK,

    Not only does your comment generally not make sense … the quotes you extracted have discernible context, the way you’ve used them.

    Basically what I’m saying is that blogger Benigno is displaying self-righteousness when he judged that parents who seek overseas employment are irresponsible parents in his own thread “Overseas foreign employment – Filipinos’ pwede-na-yan solution to poverty”.

    trying making one without looking through a red mist of personal distaste, for a change

    You should tell that to blogger Benigno.

    I wrote a post on FV detailing some of the insults he hurls at Filipinos and he operates on a “Filipino is damned if he does this and still damned if the Filipino does the opposite.”

    I can paste the entire post here if you want.

    I think someone could use a beer and a nice long nap.

    Well then go ahead; drink and sleep if you want. I don’t think I could prevent you from that even if I wanted to.

    BongV,

    b0 Is quite equipped to handle your replies without you having to drag the rest of the AP authors,

    Then I’ll be waiting for B0’s response, though BenK might benefit from your statement.

    as I am quite aware of the context upon which the statement was made.

    Like I stated above, I have proof that B0 insults Filipinos and that he operates on a “Filipino is damned if he does this and still damned if the Filipino does the opposite.”

    How many times have Antipinoy authors here stood against him when he does that? If the other Antipinoy authors see things differently, then I’m quite sure B0 will appreciate their help in answering the issues I laid back in FV on him though as you said he is equipped to handle replies to me.

    I once had a discussion in FV on an issue of “gun culture” in America . Now I can’t remember all those who participated on that discussion but my main issue is that the law is enforced rather than simply ranting against the “gun culture”.

    Not that I do not see anything wrong in Filipinos but a lot of those (though definitely not all) can be addressed by having the laws enforced (though I would say it be tempered with reason and justice).

    No one of us can demand culture change but each and everyone of us can demand that the law be enforced if it is not!

    On one occasion, day in and day out, there would be bystanders hanging around a store nearby us and continue their merry drinking outside. There is already a rule against such. So I quietly had it reported. The police assisted the barangay officials and hauled them all off. Well they definitely don’t do their merry drinking outside anymore.

    I actually read a discussion between B0 and another one regarding the enforcement of laws in Singapore (Interestingly, there is supposed to be a road near the boundary of Singapore and Malaysia that is littered with the trash from Singaporean car riders as soon as they leave Singapore) I didn’t pay much heed to that exchange because I know that B0 will be in “Filipino culture rant” mode soon enough.

    As your tirade is addressed to him, so I will leave it at that.

    Well that hasn’t stopped you before in FV but I definitely respect your decision.

  34. Not that I do not see anything wrong in Filipinos but a lot of those (though definitely not all) can be addressed by having the laws enforced (though I would say it be tempered with reason and justice).

    No one of us can demand culture change but each and everyone of us can demand that the law be enforced if it is not!

    For example, the litterbug culture. It took a strong culture of cleanliness by an executive to have a law passed, and then it took his political will to legally enforce the cultural change to make it more aligned with the culture he had in mind. Not only did he demand it, he made it happen.

    Culture can be changed through the law. Provide incentives for encouraged behavior. Provide stiff penalties for errant behavior. And of course, enforce it.

    The breakdown happens when it is time for enforcement – which is still culturally dependent.

    They obliged to your complaint, because those were “tambays”. Do you think your complaint will be addressed – if it were actually policemen or a congressman’s bodyguards who are merry-making?

  35. operates on a “Filipino is damned if he does this and still damned if the Filipino does the opposite.”

    that is just an observation, not an assertion for example – when the economy is protectionist – they keep on whining, if you open up the economy – whine pa rin.

    tell me this is not true.

  36. justice league · ·

    BongV,

    Culture can be changed through the law.

    You actually don’t need to remind me of this.

    Didn’t we have a discussion on this on FV and I brought up the issue of Emperor Meiji of Japan as the Japanese government destroyed (through laws) the Samurai class and thereby changed the Samurai culture? (Unfortunately, they also taught “what” the Japanese people were to think and not “how” to think.)

    They obliged to your complaint, because those were “tambays”. Do you think your complaint will be addressed – if it were actually policemen or a congressman’s bodyguards who are merry-making?

    Yes. I will quietly report/submit it to the media. And I will have my end result. There may come a time when they’ll do it again and I’ll quietly go to the media again. And I will have my end result again.

    Going to the media is both legal and moral on this case. It would be ideal if I didn’t have to but I will go that route if I feel that I have to.

    that is just an observation, not an assertion for example …

    I disagree.

    when the economy is protectionist – they keep on whining, if you open up the economy – whine pa rin. tell me this is not true.

    That is not true. (I’m doing you a favor on this one and you’ll realize that below, so you can thank me later)

    And it is an assertion on your part and not an observation.

    Because for that assertion to be true and is actually an observation; the SAME ONES observed to be whining that the economy is protectionist will be the SAME ONES who will be observed to be whining if the economy is opened up.

    And right now; you and some of those here are the ones observed to be whining that the economy is protectionist. Will you be the same ones whining if and when the economy is opened up?

    If you want to prove yourself right; then whine also if and when the economy is opened up.

  37. Hypocrite is one idea that comes to mind.

  38. Engr. Samuel Robles III · ·

    Ang galing ng article na ito, saludo ako sa nagsulat and all the enjoyable OFW-Related articles here. Sikat na sikat po ang Antipinoy.com dito sa Saudi lalo na yung about how OFWs can be wiser about money. Please continue your good works Antipinoy. Salamat po and Mabuhay from Jubail KSA.

    Engr Samuel Robles III and family.

  39. concerned_citizen · ·

    Any sane person would seek greener pastures. Only a fool would stay along and endure the drama here in the Philippines. I salute you Mr BongV, and I hope that someday we’d meet in person. If only the rest of our countrymen would open their eyes. OFWs are and never have been cowards. They have shown true courage in facing an uncertainty in a foreign land and for that I salute them. If it weren’t for them, we’d be living in deeper shit.

  40. Maki_Alam · ·

    Please. I think these ‘patriotic Pinoys’ who call overseas kababayans greedy cowards are hypocrites. Just dangle a green card in their faces. Tingnan lang natin kung hindi mag-stampede at mag-agawan yang mga yan.

    You want to leave? That’s fine. You want to stay? That’s fine, too. Are the judgmental comments really necessary? “Pag umalis ka, duwag ka. Dito ka lang!” Yan ang tunay na crab mentality.

  41. Can i repost this in our school’s unofficial forum mapuaownage?

    After I left the country and read articles here in AP [I was a fan since I found this site in the heat of Dick Gordon’s presidential campaign], I have realized my mistakes as a person. It was a wakeup call for me and I did my best to break the bonds of irritating and disturbing negative Filipino culture and norms [lalo na yung pakikisama, peer pressure Filipino style, etc]. Now I am sharing these articles in my FB account and to said forum above.

    Thank you guys, hope that I can write an article here someday.

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