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The World Gets Ready To Move Forward While Philippines Remains Stuck in A Moment It Can't Get Out Of

April 19, 2010

It’s just another day in the Philippines. A prosecution brouhaha is about to put another black eye on the completely bruised, next-to-useless perception of the Philippine Justice System. A situation which is caused by a massacre which just is the tip of the iceberg on the culture of impunity. And this is going in parallel with a presidential elections where the the three frontrunners out of 8 or 9 candidates are known as 1) Do Nothing; 2) Stole Everything; and 3)-About to Steal Everything (if Do Nothing were to be believed). Then we add the recent molehill-to-mountain tantrums “caused” by Carolla, Chip Tsao, Teri Hatcher, Alec Baldwin. We have yet to include the recent blacklisting of Philippine airlines in the EU. The list of dysfunctions and missed opportunities just keeps going on and on. Guess what, the list is about to get longer.

As the world emerges out of a recession, the Philippines is once again, poised (I would love to use “destined” or tadhana) to miss more opportunities.

The magazine Inbound Logistics recently published the 2010 Global Logistics guide which highlights the countries which are poised to reap the opportunities. In its preface to the guide, the publishers wrote:

The weight of the world recession was felt in equal measures this past year, shocking local economies and regional trades, and seismically shifting the way U.S. businesses spin and span the globe.

Contraction was widespread. Consumerism dropped, freight flows congealed, and imports, exports, and GDPs took precipitous dives. While the sting of the financial crisis was largely impartial, a global rebound will be anything but. Countries that have made transportation and logistics infrastructure a priority will spring to demand — and it to them — when trade returns. Global expansion is increasingly complex as new markets open up and developing countries mature. Businesses are exploring secondary and tertiary sourcing strategies to reduce risk; balancing offshore and nearshore manufacturing points to manage lead times, reduce total landed costs, and increase market responsiveness; and they are looking at emerging markets where they can manufacture and sell.

Inbound Logistics’ 6th annual Global Logistics Guide offers a reference as you evaluate new horizons for growth. IL identifies global hotspots as excelling in three key areas:

1. TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE. The density and breadth of airport, port, and road infrastructure.

2. IT COMPETENCY. The progressiveness of information and communication technology investment and development as measured by The World Economic Forum’s Networked Readiness Index.

3. BUSINESS CULTURE. The strength of homegrown logistics talent, cultural and language similarities, government leadership, historical U.S. foreign direct investment outflow, and economic freedom.

This year’s methodology adds a new wrinkle with the introduction of a Business Culture index. It includes cultural variables that appeal to U.S. businesses, as well as pro-business trends such as historical investment, future economic potential, and government leadership.

There are intangibles at play as well. Our X-Factor provision takes into account elements, such as political stability and labor availability, that may give businesses greater pause, or greater purpose, as they evaluate a country’s logistics capabilities.

Our Global Logistics Guide offers a macro perspective of the global supply chain to help you quantify and qualify expansion opportunities with countries that best fit your logistics and supply chain needs

METHODOLOGY:
Countries are ranked on three criteria: Transportation Infrastructure (1 to 4 points), IT Competency (1 to 3 points), and Business Culture (1 to 3 points). Points are totaled for all categories — taking into consideration X-Factor +/- points — to determine final ranking: 10 is highest, 3 is lowest.

Sources: U.S. Department of State; World Port Rankings, American Association of Port Authorities (AAPA); Airports Council International; World Economic Forum’s Growth Competitiveness Index; World Economic Forum’s Global Information Technology Report; Central Intelligence Agency’s World Fact Book; Bureau of Economic Analysis, U.S. Direct Investment Abroad; 2010 Index of Economic Freedom, The Wall Street Journal & The Heritage Foundation.

You can read the full guide here:

[gview file=”https://sanamagan.files.wordpress.com/2010/04/globalguide20101.pdf”%5D

I zeroed in on Southeast Asia just to get a feel for what was coming in the horizon. The countries that were in the radar screen (from highest to lowest ranking) included:

Singapore – 9
Japan – 8
Taiwan – 8
China – 8
Korea – 7
Malaysia – 5
India – 5
Thailand – 4

I was looking for the Philippines, but obviously – it wasn’t even in the radar screen.

Don’t you remember the days when if a product was Made in Japan, it was inferior. Then Made in Japan became synonymous with quality. Taiwan replaced Japan’s stead – if it was made in Taiwan, it was “inferior”. Then, Taiwan was replaced by Korea, if it was made in Korea – it was “inferior”. Then Korea was replaced by Malaysia, if it was made in Malaysia, it was “inferior” and Japan, Taiwan, Korea were “superior”. Today, China has taken the stead that was once held by Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Malaysia. Singapore then wasn’t even in the radar screen. India wasn’t even a blip then. That was then, this is now, as IL points out:

India is a worthy challenger to China in terms of labor cost differential, and its cultural commonalities, logistics expertise, and educated workforce are major advantages for companies considering offshore expansion in Asia. The country also has a growing cluster of port facilities around its horn, though connectivity to the interior is still a major problem. As with China, India’s socio-economic standing is stressed by a large population and sizable disparity in wealth distribution. Still, its conservative fiscal policies and import/export trade balance have given foreign companies a solid footing for speculation.

Apart from Singapore and Malaysia, which are top logistics spots by virtue of their transportation facilities, Southeast Asia’s allure lies in non-developed countries such as Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia.

These markets are still on the fringe for most U.S. companies, largely because primitive transport capabilities impede time to market. Still, some are circumventing these obstacles by regionalizing their offshore supply chains. Using locations such as Hong Kong, Mumbai, and Klang to distribute product from, thereby shortening transport miles where roads and resources are scarce, companies can still capture manufacturing economies without sacrificing expediency.

Here’s the guide for Southeast Asia – and the Philippines is nowhere to be found.

Shall we rally in the streets again because the Philippines was not included in the list? Shall we go to the Facebook of IL and say it is racist and spout vindictives? Shall we call DFA to protest why we are not in the guide? Ahhhh, the heights of Da Pinoy’s ridiculousness never knows any bounds.

After reading the guide, I had this nagging question.

Who next will we label as “inferior”, who in a few years will become “superior” – while the Philippines remains STUCK IN A MOMENT IT CAN’T GET OUT OF.

Before we even go into this “inferior”, “superior” labels, the Philippines and Da Pinoy needs to be reminded – we are not even in the game – and all the while, we have all these Pinoys mouthing the Philippines (or a part thereof) need not change, because it already is the best – the best in what exactly?

This is one of those days when Pinoys need to be reminded – Get Your Sh*t Together, Philippines.

METHODOLOGY:
Countries are ranked on three criteria: Transportation Infrastructure (1 to 4 points), IT Competency (1 to 3 points), and Business Culture (1 to 3 points). Points are totaled for all categories — taking into consideration X-Factor +/- points — to determine final ranking: 10 is highest, 3 is lowest.

From → Education

29 Comments
  1. Zadkiel permalink

    It seems we only got exportable manpower for x-factor.

  2. bokyo permalink

    Ahhh.. that was a big blow in the face on the predicament this country is facing. Carolla is right in much sense, Filipinos should get their s*** up or else we’ll be in a rut.

  3. Wow, this is quite a revelation. I would expect the local authorities to dismiss this, however, just like the GCI and the IEF and every other third-party assessment that comes along. And then tell us again about the awesome BPO sector here. hahahaha

  4. The social framework of the Philippines is built on a trade of favors, not on individual excellence and productivity. That’s why skill is not the criterion for important appointments, but returning or getting favors is. To compete in the global environment, which prizes productivity and achievement, the social framework of the Philippines needs to change. Actions needed: fair employment act, effective judiciary, foreign investment to jump-start the economy, proper education of kids on achievement , and ending poverty as the driving element of the trade of favors. When excellence and productivity are prized, rather than shunted aside for favors, things can improve dramatically and the Philippines can get on the global radar.

    Joe

  5. brianitus permalink

    I have a feeling that Bong was listening to U2 when he wrote this. LOL.

    RP dropped out of contention in the global logistics market in 2009 when the FEDEX Asian Hub finally pulled out of Subic in favor of transferring operations to Guangzhou. This was announced about 2 years before their planned move. I think authorities in 2009 were even hopeful that the Chinese will mess up.

    I’m not sure if DHL still maintains its sorting hub in Metro Manila.

    Anyway, failure to meet Item #1 was already enough reason for this country not to be included in the rankings.

    Moving out of the moment requires that the country knows where it wants to go. From the looks of things, growth in the transportation sector is not where it wants to go. We’ve seen that in the EU ban and the FAA downgrade.

  6. For now, we’re good in call center jobs. la Gloria managed to improve the industry from 100 million revenue source to billions of dollars revenue source.

    At least we have something to say about Philippines being good at.

  7. J.B.

    The better answer would have been to say:Get to a score of 4 or 5 within 4 to 5 years. Gordon can do that job at the most cost-effective rates – with Fernando’s help.😉

    Kidding aside, The global outsourcing market is projected to clock US$373 billion in total revenue by the end of 2009, growing 14.4 percent over 2008, according to the XMG report. In the report by Canada-based research firm XMG Global, India and China were singled out as the market’s top revenue generators, pulling in revenues worth US$48 billion and US$28 billion, respectively. According to Vincent Altez, senior analyst at XMG, India will account for 44.8 percent of the global market, while China will hold at 25.9 percent. India’s market share is expected to remain similar over 2008, due in large to accounting adjustments following Satyam’s financial scandal and demand moving to other offshore countries.

    Altez said in the report: “We are seeing new levels of normalcy in which the recession has provided the opportunity to rationalize, and shift work to other offshore destinations other than India. XMG named the Philippines as the third-best performing destination, growing an estimated of 21.7 percent to register US$7.3 billion in revenues by year-end. The figure is still lower than the initial forecast of 24 percent, the research firm noted, where demand has been sluggish due to slower growth for IT services and delay in expansion plans by major market players in the country.

    **

    Clearly even our BPO industry (not just logistics) is affected by IT. You see, IT is to industry what a central nervous system is to a body. Given the decrepit IT infrastructure of the Philippines (forget the sh*t Globe and Bayantel are telling you), if the Philippines were a human body, if its Central nervous system were anything like the Philippines IT infrastructure – it will be a person partially paralyzed -or possibly, stricken with MS.

  8. ben permalink

    But you do realize that the Call-Center industry encourages Under-employment right?

  9. LOLZ. Did IL purposely covered the Philippine map with the Taiwan description? At least it covers our shame, which is quite an act if grace from them (seriously) Hahahhaha!!!😄

  10. Our own domestic helpers and other employees may already be serving Carolla, his relatives, or colleagues. Others will say, he depends on our maids, so he should shut up. But in truth, those maids depend on Carolla for the pay. So who’s got the short end now?

  11. BongV you should know that Call Center business in the Philippines is probably next to none. I spoke to one investor here in Melbourne and he consider the Philippines one of the best, if not the best.

    Now, that speaks volumes about our IT competency and infrastructural strength compared to the rest of other competitors.

    If you had the money, the government can give you all in one package – pluggable building and superb recruitment drive. If you want masters degree to man the office, you name it, you can pull it in an instant.

    We can theorize all we want that others can do better but the fact remains, GMA did give the Philippines billions of dollars. (Maybe this is the reason why she turned deaf and blind to 150 million dollar supposed kickback in NBN, she’s already dealings with billions, a million must be a barya for her).

  12. Of course it is. We can only count on what we have and not what we don’t have at this point.

  13. Not to be a drag as I have a history with the Call Center industry in our country, but I believe that having a booming BPO sector is not something that we should just rest our laurels on. It’s ONE sector, not much of a pillar if you ask me as it is a volatile market. You never know when and where the demand will be shifted. At the moment, we are enjoying part of the demand as we can speak English fluently and we can fill the skills requirement. But the rest of the world is catching up on this.

    Although I agree that we are competent when it comes to IT skills, I cannot agree with the comment about our infrastructure. Our current IT infrastructure can be barely considered as “existing”. If I compare ours with the rest of our neighbors in SEA, I don’t even know if we can best Indonesia. Don’t even try to compare with the likes of Singapore, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Taiwan or South Korea. Singapore, at the moment, is in the midst of laying our fiber optic cables across their entire island which will ensure a minimum of 1Gbps internet access for every home. Wireless access across the island also boasts a maximum of roughly 27-30Mbps. And our country is wallowing in a 756kbps wireless service that dies if you got your antenna facing in the wrong direction.

    Don’t get me wrong, I have a clear appreciation of the differences that makes it a lot challenging for the Philippines to get a better, more reliable IT infrastructure. It is sad to think, however, that many of those challenges are not because we “can’t” do it; rather it’s because someone or a group of people who have the clout to make the necessary decisions and push progress on this have their heads buried up so deep in their you-now-what and only looking at their “bottom” line.

    I love the Philippines. That is why I am hoping for a leader who have the balls to slap us hard enough to get out of this complacent daze we are in and make us think that one good thing about our country is not enough. An individual’s success is not enough – would you be considered successful if only your pinky is looking healthy and the rest of your body looks like it has been dragged behind a car around the block?

  14. Outside looking in permalink

    I found the post a bit disturbing and misleading. Here are my points:

    First off, Japan, Taiwan and China are not in Southeast Asia. For any reader who did not paid attention to their “HEKASI” class might think this is true. No. Furthermore, I think the IL scanned page was taken out of context, which leads me to my second point.

    We should compare apples to apples and oranges to oranges. To get the proper context comparison should be made among countries in Southeast Asia. China and India are considered to be emerging economies, and in some instances (depending on the measure used) may already have surpassed growth miracle countries like South Korea or Taiwan. Economies vary on their size and capacity, and economists consider these two to be one of the biggest economies in the world. For example, our imports from China may be around 20-30% but China’s exports to us may be just around less than 1%.

    At the end of the day we are lagging yes. But we should also present both sides. There are areas which we are strong and may areas we are weak. I am with AntiPinoy on their crusade but we should also set facts straight here.

    Cheers.

  15. BongV you should know that Call Center business in the Philippines is probably next to none. I spoke to one investor here in Melbourne and he consider the Philippines one of the best, if not the best.

    I so would like to agree with you, BUT third party sources do not allow me to make such a conclusion.

    Now, that speaks volumes about our IT competency and infrastructural strength compared to the rest of other competitors.

    Not really. The IT scorecard isn’t just about BPO’s JB – it’s also about the ability to run corporate VPNs – for example, An office in Minnesota can VPN to an office in Manila – and would respond as if the drive was stored on the local network – BPO is just one sector. The IT when it comes to logistics also involves EDI between companies, brokers, financial intermediaries, customs – that’s level of integration and interaction between diverse IT resources is not available in the Philippines at the momeny.

    If you had the money, the government can give you all in one package – pluggable building and superb recruitment drive. If you want masters degree to man the office, you name it, you can pull it in an instant.

    We can theorize all we want that others can do better but the fact remains, GMA did give the Philippines billions of dollars. (Maybe this is the reason why she turned deaf and blind to 150 million dollar supposed kickback in NBN, she’s already dealings with billions, a million must be a barya for her).

    I disagree that it was GMA, it was the foreign investors who invested – NOT GMA. It’s the Filipinos who worked – NOT GMA. If anything, liberalization ought to be credited to FVR- not GMA.

  16. I found the post a bit disturbing and misleading. Here are my points:

    First off, Japan, Taiwan and China are not in Southeast Asia. For any reader who did not paid attention to their “HEKASI”class might think this is true. No. Furthermore, I think the IL scanned page was taken out of context, which leads me to my second point.

    That would be true in the general practice –  however, the title of the map still does not have anything to do with the scores. Moreover, the corporate world comes up with categories as it sees fit and does not limit itself to “HEKASI”. For example, everything in Asia can be lumped under “The Far East”. In this case, IL exercises artistic licenses.

    We should compare apples to apples and oranges to oranges. To get the proper context comparison should be made among countries in Southeast Asia. China and India are considered to be emerging economies, and in some instances (depending on the measure used) may already have surpassed growth miracle countries like South Korea or Taiwan. Economies vary on their size and capacity, and economists consider these two to be one of the biggest economies in the world. For example, our imports from China may be around 20-30% but China�s exports to us may be just around less than 1%.

    That’s based on the relativist approach. The absolutist scorecard however, does not make excuses for relativism. If one were to base it on size, one Singapore, the smallest of em all ought to be on the bottom of the list😉

    The comparisons are apples to apples – the logistics, IT, and business culture are being scored precisely to remove the ambiguity. 

    And yes, you are supposed to be disturbed. Although, when it comes to the Philippines – I am way far gone beyond disturbed – it does not disturb me anymore. After seeing this latest trends – Noynoy, Ampatuan, Ondoy – it just cements the perception that the Philippines is a hopeless basket case – and that AP is a SETI outpost scanning the heavens for any sign of intelligence.

    At the end of the day we are lagging yes. But we should also present both sides. There are areas which we are strong and may areas we are weak. I am with AntiPinoy on their crusade but we should also set facts straight here.

    And this is what AP does – present the both sides – and the facts are straight – the scores are there for you to dispute with IL.

    Cheers.

  17. In addition, don’t you want to expand what we have? It’s possible to grow this, after all.

  18. That was actually based on real facts and not third party. Look, you can count on the number of telco’s call ceter here in Australia which are being outsourced in the Philippines.

    Now, there are Indians outsources also manning centers in the Philippines.

    There are still much to be desired about infrastructure and I agree about people strangling it to their favor.

    It was GMA. She spent so much time visiting agents in call centers just to see who”s responsible for it.

  19. JB:

    I have reason to believe that the XMG study provides a more accurate assessment – looking back to 2007:

    http://www.xmg-global.com/cidver/press_releases/varticle.html?id=21&aid=4

    Analyst Firm Issues 2007 Year End Performance Estimates for Global Outsourcing Market
    Victoria, Canada – October 27, 2007

    Better than expected performance of offshore; strong growth but turbulence times ahead.

    Independent forecast study conducted by leading ICT research and advisory firm XMG announced today that the global outsourcing market for IT, BPO and Call center services will finish 2007 at US$297 billion with an estimated growth rate of 19.31%. This projected revenue estimate is up from its 2006 figure of US$249 billion. The report revealed analyst expectations of the total outsourcing market to hit US$450 billion by 2010. The scope of the global market in this study includes both the onshore and offshore delivery of outsourcing services. The study is part of its year-to-end forecast conducted in the fourth quarter to estimate year-end performance of the global outsourcing market.

    The crux of the study centered on the performance of the 4 top Asian offshore countries namely: India, China, Malaysia and the Philippines. India is estimated to corner US$34.1B in total revenue by year end 2007 at 29.5% CAGR and settling in with 11.5% share of the global market. XMG estimates India will continue to lead the offshore segment through 2010 with at least 15% share. China is estimated to have 4.4% share of the global market with 2007 total revenue figures forecasted to hit US$13.1B while growing at 47.9% CAGR. “While it is no surprise that India and China continues to lead amongst the offshore countries, our study also showed a noteworthy insight to those following the growth of other offshore countries in Asia”, commented Lauro Vives, Founding President and Chief Analyst of XMG. “The Philippines is experiencing an unprecedented growth rate of 62% CAGR and will surpass Malaysia in 2007”. According to the XMG intelligence report, the Philippines’ revenue is expected to grow to almost US$4.1B and thereby achieving 1.4% of the global market share. “The Philippine industry has far exceeded all analyst expectations”, added Vives. In comparison, Malaysia’s revenue forecast by year end is estimated at US$3.6B achieving 1.2% of the global market share. In 2006, Malaysia and the Philippines was neck-and-neck with 1.04% and 1.02% respectively of the share of the global revenue pie.

    Even with Malaysia’s 38% growth, the report showed that other countries are outpacing Malaysia primarily due to the country’s lack of available manpower to sustain the growth of its offshore and outsourcing industry. “Locators are turning to other countries where there is headroom for further growth and expansion”, added Vives. “This continues to show that the strategy for expanding offshore rests on the availability of manpower in that country. Our competitor intelligence report shows that the typical profile of offshore locators, whether service providers or captives, is to have the foresight that they can grow anywhere from 60% to 90% year on year unabated over the next two to three years”. The report also cited that Malaysia recognizes its limited manpower size and have been steadfastly focusing on increasing revenue share through higher value services.

    Looking forward to 2008, the study showed turbulence but continued strong growth in the offshore markets citing the rising cost of operations and the continuing depreciation of the US dollar. Other than China and Malaysia, the cost of operations in India and the Philippines is increasing due to wage rate hikes to retain people and the rise in real estate prices. Both India and the Philippines are estimated to experience continuing general wage increases of 11% and 8% respectively due to talent supply problems. The spiraling effect of the US dollar and the accelerated appreciation of Asian domestic currencies such as the India Rupee and Philippine Peso is also a factor. “For every percentage point these currencies appreciate relative to the US dollar, we typically see the cost advantages affected by 20 to 30 basis points”, Vives continued.

    The phrase that comes to my mind is “one sparrow does not a summer make”.

    Customer service centers are just one aspect of the logistics IT infrastructure – mission critical customer service centers however are still located in the regional logistics headquarters – the countries which had the highest balanced scorecard rating.

  20. While I agree that in infrastructure itself we lagged behind, that doesn’t tell about the number of business turn-offs. How many investors see Philippines less capable in terms of delivering the services?

    What we see instead is there is huge companies lured by the attractive package the Philippines call center sector has to offer.

    Even in the dollar figures, there is no point of comparison of India and China knowing their billion-peopled country is too many compared to less 100-millioned country.

  21. J.B.

    What the Philippines is getting is just the crumbs.

    We can’t be satisfied with crumbs – but as long as we don’t have our sh*t together we will keep on getting crumbs.

    Not everyone can work in BPOs you know.

  22. Outside looking in permalink

    “The absolutist scorecard however, does not make excuses for relativism. If one were to base it on size, one Singapore, the smallest of em all ought to be on the bottom of the list.”

    Singapore might be very little in a geographic sense but it sure packs a lot of economic power in Southeast Asia. I did not get what you meant when you said Singapore must be at the bottom. Whatever it is, it does not matter.

    What is interesting here is the “absolute scorecard”. If we were to follow idea of of being absolute then none of the exisiting economies would be judged as the best as being good in absolute terms is equivalent to perfection. The exception to this is that if you were to set as bar (or standard) the best performing economy out there – now that is being relative.

  23. Bong, that appeased enough my concept of transitory and spillovers.

    Transitory in the sense that people who are working at least can help people who can’t specially relatives who needs help thus exponentially sharing the crumbs🙂.

    Spillovers in the sense that it would be possible in the future that we will never find a solution on our own. Instead we will progress because there are just too many spillovers.

    And why would the world care? Jihadist started already training our Sayafs. The only way to avert the impending disaster it will write on the face of advanced economies is to spill their goodies to us. Sad of course but it is possible and doable.

  24. J.B.

    At that rate, when the rest of ASEAN is OECD status, we will still be an NIC.

  25. usi permalink

    @Outside looking in: BongV mentioned SG because you said, “Economies vary on their size and capacity” ..SG is a very small country (a city state actually) but it’s First World.

  26. elle permalink

    exactly, sad to say we are so far from achieving this (or at least for now). there is always a chance given if we have the right leaders to drive us into this direction.

  27. makoto permalink

    The Call Center Industry? Are we still banking on that as our savior? Ask any HR Manager of the Call Centers in this country just how many Filipinos are qualified to have a seat in a Call Center? Just ask how many qualified Filipinos they are getting to fill in a 1000 seats? The truth of the matter is very few Filipinos can actually speak English well these days. I’m a child of the 80’s and back then I’ve seen several of my peers call me ‘maarte’ or ‘konyo’ simply because I prefer using English from time to time and I don’t speak English like Jimmy Santos or the way Kris Aquino has destroyed the language. These same people are now lining up for jobs in Call Centers hoping to get a job despite their broken English speaking skills. I feel like a hypocrite saying this since I know I myself cannot speak perfect English nor can I write with perfect grammar and spelling skills. But my point is, Filipinos have shunned learning the English language. Very few people appreciate it for what it is.

    China is aggressively trying to teach their people how to speak in English. While yes, they haven’t quite grasped the language just yet, you see a desire in the government and the people themselves to learn English in the hopes of being more competitive. The reason why some call center jobs are in India more than China is because India learned how to speak English first (of course with their History how can they not?). But China is catching up and as soon as China catches up what will be left in the Philippines?

    Can we compete against China given the poor state of our nation’s English skills? Let’s add up our left-behind information technology structure and the bruhaha some politicians have (i.e. ZTE scandal on both sides) on trying to get a piece of the pie first before offering it to the people, what do we have left?

    Let’s not be complacent with regard to our call center industry. Until the Filipinos wise up and try to put more initiative in learning, not just English more more skill sets, we might as well kiss our country goodbye and pray that one day the United States might annex us so we can get free Health Care.

  28. ben permalink

    Very true mate. And Noynoy’s sister is one of those we can blame🙂
    We’ve lost the competitive nature and those who try to excel are treated as show offs. But then, when someone does excel, guess what? The nation tries to take credit: “Ang galing ng Pinoy!” Ironic isn’t it?

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